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The Benefits of Citizenship


Every year many people become naturalized, or are given rights, as U.S citizens

What Are The Benefits of Citizenship?

The most important benefit is the right to vote in elections.  In a democracy, citizens can play a big role in shaping the decisions a country makes.  The desires and opinions of citizens can influence elected lawmakers.  Since citizens have the right to vote, they can elect officials whose political ideas they share.  If they are unhappy with an elected official, they can vote for someone else in the next election.  Citizens can run for political office themselves.
 

If you are a citizen you can file a petition to legally bring your parents, unmarried children who are minors, and husband or wife to the United States.  Generally, they will get their permanent resident (or legal) status quickly.  Citizens can also bring their adult children and brothers and sisters here, although getting permanent residence will take longer.

Having a U.S. passport allows citizens the freedom to travel.  You can travel for long periods of time.  You can also live outside of the United States.  In addition, citizens receive U.S. Government protection and assistance when abroad.

A U.S. citizen cannot be deported, or sent back to his or her native country.  U.S. citizenship is protection against deportation.

A permanent resident may continue receiving SSI (Supplemental Security Income) benefits, if they become a citizen within seven years from when those benefits began.  Failure to become a citizen within seven years will result in loss of supplemental income.  Once they loose it, they can reapply once citizenship is obtained.

A permanent resident may continue receiving SSI (Supplemental Security Income) benefits, if they become a citizen within seven years from when those benefits began.  Failure to become a citizen within seven years will result in loss of supplemental income.  Once they loose it, they can reapply once citizenship is obtained.

Personal Responses from students about Citizenship:

"I want to feel a part of where I live.  To participate as a citizen."

Citizenship Includes Some Responsibilities

One final part of the citizenship process is to take an oath of allegiance.  The Oath of Allegiance includes several promises you must make when you become a citizen, including promises to:

        Give up prior allegiances to other countries;

        Support and defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States;

        Swear allegiance to the United States; and

        Serve the country when required

Citizens have many responsibilities other than the ones mentioned in the oath.  Some of the key points of good citizenship are summarized on back.  This is not a definitive list, but if citizens pledge themselves to doing each of them, this generation and generations that follow will continue to enjoy the American heritage of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Serving Jury Duty
The obligation to serve on a jury is the other side of the right of trial by jury, one of our most powerful freedoms.

Respecting others
Tolerance is not only "putting up" with other people who are different from ourselves, it's the spirit of trying to understand them.  It is the judgment of people as individuals rather than of classes.  The best advice for living peacefully with our fellow citizens is: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

Supporting education and schools
A Massachusetts law enacted in 1647 founded the first system of public education in the American colonies.  Today every stated has a compulsory education law and publicly controlled schools that, are free and open to the public.  Our nation's future depends on educated citizens who acquire skills to enhance our economy and who keep themselves informed so leaders will not influence them or philosophies that weaken rather than strengthen our nation.

Giving Back To Your Community
Working together as a community cue can accomplish much more than we can ever hope to achieve alone.  As citizens each of us has an obligation to make our community a little better place.  Giving back means giving of your time and ability rather than money.  Another word for this is volunteering.

Paying Taxes
If you work, you pay taxes.  Taxes provide highways, police and fire protection, military forces, clean water, and safe food.  They make possible the public schools, libraries, parks, and everything public (Streetlights etc.).  You pay city, state and federal taxes. Taxes represent the cost of our government doing business.  As unpleasant as paying taxes may be, taxation with, representation is a vast improvement over a government that taxes and takes your assets without you having a say about it.  It is very important that you pay your taxes.  Many of the financial benefits people receive come from taxpayer's money.  It  is a law that you file income taxes!

 

Marshall Adult Education
HOME | MISSION | SCOPE AND SEQUENCE | STAFF INFORMATION |SITE SCHEDULES|
TECHNOLOGY | WORKFORCE |
BUSINESS CONNECTION DIRECTORY | GRANTS
| RESOURCES


Lyon County Government Center    607 W. Main St.    Marshall, MN 56258    (507) 537-7046



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